10:25 am, clairiere
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jacqalan:

Ayrton Senna , Monaco 1984.

The day Senna grabbed F1’s attention

While Formula One remembers Ayrton Senna on the 20th anniversary of his death at Imola, happier memories of another race 10 years earlier highlight just why the great Brazilian is still so sorely missed.
The 1984 Monaco Grand Prix, held in pouring rain, was when even the sleepiest followers of the sport woke up to just what a talent they had in their midst.
Senna, starting in 13th place in the first street race of his rookie season and in a car that he had failed to qualify two races earlier at Imola, finished second to McLaren’s Alain Prost - his future team mate and rival - for his first F1 podium.
The harder the rain came down, the quicker he went. The Brazilian set the fastest lap and was poised to take the lead when the race was stopped controversially and half points awarded.

jacqalan:

Ayrton Senna , Monaco 1984.

The day Senna grabbed F1’s attention

While Formula One remembers Ayrton Senna on the 20th anniversary of his death at Imola, happier memories of another race 10 years earlier highlight just why the great Brazilian is still so sorely missed.

The 1984 Monaco Grand Prix, held in pouring rain, was when even the sleepiest followers of the sport woke up to just what a talent they had in their midst.

Senna, starting in 13th place in the first street race of his rookie season and in a car that he had failed to qualify two races earlier at Imola, finished second to McLaren’s Alain Prost - his future team mate and rival - for his first F1 podium.

The harder the rain came down, the quicker he went. The Brazilian set the fastest lap and was poised to take the lead when the race was stopped controversially and half points awarded.


10:17 am, clairiere
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life-and-everything:

The thing that always strikes me about Senna’s driving is how much the car moves. Some drivers are very smooth and deliberate and that’s how they’re fast. Senna was fast because the car was constantly in motion, dancing around to find the best line and the best traction. Even with the most lifeless chassis, Senna made the car come alive.

life-and-everything:

The thing that always strikes me about Senna’s driving is how much the car moves. Some drivers are very smooth and deliberate and that’s how they’re fast. Senna was fast because the car was constantly in motion, dancing around to find the best line and the best traction. Even with the most lifeless chassis, Senna made the car come alive.

(Source: amjayes)


09:51 am, clairiere
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worshipgifs:


"If you have God on your side, everything becomes clear." _ Ayrton Senna

We are five weeks from the 20th anniversary of Ayrton Senna’s death, an event that retains the capacity to chill even at this distance. Weirdly Senna, a deeply religious man, would have readily accepted his fate since in his world view the crash at Imola’s Tamburello corner ushered him into God’s realm at the time of the Almighty’s calling.
When Senna slipped behind the wheel of a Formula Car he was communing with God, expressing through his own agency the will of the architect of all things. In death at the age of 34 he was immortalised as one of the greatest drivers in the pantheon. On Friday he would have been 54. Sadly we will never know how time would have treated him in middle age. The memory, supported by the books, the documentaries and the films, preserves Senna in the full beauty of youth, as a driver who reset the parameters of what was possible, a genius who intuited the driving enterprise like few before or since. A record at the time of 41 race wins from 161 grands prix and 65 poles took him to three world titles, a towering monument to a talent that would have delivered even more.
If you were to pick a race that epitomised his gifts the 1993 European Grand Prix at Donington would be high on the list of most. In conditions that test the skill and nerve of the driver most, wet/dry, Senna went from fifth to first before the end of the opening lap. In a game of musical pit stops (Alain Prost made seven to Senna’s four) Senna finished almost a minute and a half ahead of the field. It was a freak outcome that took him, his helmet pierced by a piece of suspension that came away on impact with the concrete wall. Ratzenberger’s death was the first Senna had experienced in his Formula One career. His own remains the last driver fatality to afflict the sport, though track staff have subsequently been killed by flying debris. It was beyond comprehension that one such as he might be vulnerable doing what he did better than the rest. That said, for those who share his religious beliefs it is perhaps a comfort that he met his end doing what he loved. Like all racing men, Senna lived on the edge of existence, racing the car on the limit of its performance. On May 1, 1994 he fell the wrong side of a fine line. 
More than one million people lined the streets of Sao Paulo at his funeral. His grave in Morumbi, the affluent suburb where he grew up, is marked by a single plaque that bears his dates and the inscription: Nada pode me separar do amor de Deus (Nothing can separate me from the love of God). The simplicity of the setting bears an inverse relation to the significance of his achievements and the power of a name that resonates as much today as it did when he raced. (x)

worshipgifs:

"If you have God on your side, everything becomes clear." _ Ayrton Senna

We are five weeks from the 20th anniversary of Ayrton Senna’s death, an event that retains the capacity to chill even at this distance. Weirdly Senna, a deeply religious man, would have readily accepted his fate since in his world view the crash at Imola’s Tamburello corner ushered him into God’s realm at the time of the Almighty’s calling.

When Senna slipped behind the wheel of a Formula Car he was communing with God, expressing through his own agency the will of the architect of all things. In death at the age of 34 he was immortalised as one of the greatest drivers in the pantheon. On Friday he would have been 54. Sadly we will never know how time would have treated him in middle age. The memory, supported by the books, the documentaries and the films, preserves Senna in the full beauty of youth, as a driver who reset the parameters of what was possible, a genius who intuited the driving enterprise like few before or since. A record at the time of 41 race wins from 161 grands prix and 65 poles took him to three world titles, a towering monument to a talent that would have delivered even more.

If you were to pick a race that epitomised his gifts the 1993 European Grand Prix at Donington would be high on the list of most. In conditions that test the skill and nerve of the driver most, wet/dry, Senna went from fifth to first before the end of the opening lap. In a game of musical pit stops (Alain Prost made seven to Senna’s four) Senna finished almost a minute and a half ahead of the field. It was a freak outcome that took him, his helmet pierced by a piece of suspension that came away on impact with the concrete wall. Ratzenberger’s death was the first Senna had experienced in his Formula One career. His own remains the last driver fatality to afflict the sport, though track staff have subsequently been killed by flying debris. It was beyond comprehension that one such as he might be vulnerable doing what he did better than the rest. That said, for those who share his religious beliefs it is perhaps a comfort that he met his end doing what he loved. Like all racing men, Senna lived on the edge of existence, racing the car on the limit of its performance. On May 1, 1994 he fell the wrong side of a fine line.

More than one million people lined the streets of Sao Paulo at his funeral. His grave in Morumbi, the affluent suburb where he grew up, is marked by a single plaque that bears his dates and the inscription: Nada pode me separar do amor de Deus (Nothing can separate me from the love of God). The simplicity of the setting bears an inverse relation to the significance of his achievements and the power of a name that resonates as much today as it did when he raced. (x)


09:43 am, clairiere
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mclaren-soul:

Jerez 1990. Martin Donnelly has an accident and nearly dies at the track. Professor Sid Watkins treats him and saves his life. 
Only a few minutes later, Senna arrives at the scene, talks with the doctors and walks away. Puts his helmet on and drives one of the fastest laps ever at the track.
Luckily, Donnelly survived and stated just how surprised he was about Senna’s behaviour: “Ayrton walked there to where I’d crashed. He’s there by Prof and the medics while they are working on me.
“That is the amazing thing for me. Ayrton watched all of that, saw it all first-hand, holding my crash helmet and possibly watching me die from a crash. He watched all the needles and syringes and the tracheotomy. Then he went back to his garage, put his helmet back on, visor down, and with just 10 minutes left, did the fastest lap of Jerez ever of that track.
“How do you switch off the emotion of what you have just seen that’s in there – in your mind – and then do that kind of job?. That takes somebody very special.
“It wasn’t only me he saw. He stopped with Comas, and Zanardi, and at Imola went to see Rubens and Roland when they had their big accidents that weekend in ’94. Maybe that was Ayrton’s way of dealing with it? Maybe he needed a near-death experience to see for himself, to make it feel that it was less likely to happen to him?”
(via Motorsport Retro)

mclaren-soul:

Jerez 1990. Martin Donnelly has an accident and nearly dies at the track. Professor Sid Watkins treats him and saves his life. 

Only a few minutes later, Senna arrives at the scene, talks with the doctors and walks away. Puts his helmet on and drives one of the fastest laps ever at the track.

Luckily, Donnelly survived and stated just how surprised he was about Senna’s behaviour: “Ayrton walked there to where I’d crashed. He’s there by Prof and the medics while they are working on me.

That is the amazing thing for me. Ayrton watched all of that, saw it all first-hand, holding my crash helmet and possibly watching me die from a crash. He watched all the needles and syringes and the tracheotomy. Then he went back to his garage, put his helmet back on, visor down, and with just 10 minutes left, did the fastest lap of Jerez ever of that track.

How do you switch off the emotion of what you have just seen that’s in there – in your mind – and then do that kind of job?. That takes somebody very special.

It wasn’t only me he saw. He stopped with Comas, and Zanardi, and at Imola went to see Rubens and Roland when they had their big accidents that weekend in ’94. Maybe that was Ayrton’s way of dealing with it? Maybe he needed a near-death experience to see for himself, to make it feel that it was less likely to happen to him?”

(via Motorsport Retro)


09:38 am, clairiere
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pitwall:

On the 1st of May, 1994, the Formula 1 community was rattled by the second fatality of the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix weekend, following the passing of Roland Ratzenberger only the day previous. Ayrton Senna, a 3-time World Champion, superbly skilled, and intelligent individual both on and off the track and an enigmatic character in the eyes of many, tragically passed away upon colliding into a barrier during the race. Senna’s fatal accident remains the last within Formula 1. 
R.I.P Ayrton Senna (1960-1994).

pitwall:

On the 1st of May, 1994, the Formula 1 community was rattled by the second fatality of the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix weekend, following the passing of Roland Ratzenberger only the day previous. Ayrton Senna, a 3-time World Champion, superbly skilled, and intelligent individual both on and off the track and an enigmatic character in the eyes of many, tragically passed away upon colliding into a barrier during the race. Senna’s fatal accident remains the last within Formula 1. 

R.I.P Ayrton Senna (1960-1994).


09:36 am, clairiere
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life-and-everything:

One of the most defining scenes of Ayrton Senna for me. He abandons his car in the middle of a race and runs across the track to help a fellow driver. Despite what a lot of people said about him, despite his sometimes ruthless driving, Senna was still human and still had one of the biggest hearts of any racing driver. He was mortally hurt when Roland Ratzenberger died the day before he did. Little did people know but Senna was heavily committed to improved safety regulations for F1 cars and that he was working on bringing back the drivers organization that worked for improved car design.

(Source: deguzzi)


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barbarastanwyck:

Iconic Film Costumes

Scarlett O’ Hara’s Curtain Dress designed by Walter Plunkett for Gone With the Wind

The color of the dress presented Plunkett with several problems. It had to suit the color of Vivien Leigh’s eyes and it had to conform to Technicolor specifications. Furthermore, it had to look as if it were made from the draperies at Tara. So the dress was aged as if the sun had faded the material.

Also known as the Drapery Dress and the Portieres Dress, the dress has a moss green velvet overskirt that parts in the front to reveal a chartreuse velvet underskirt. It has fitted sleeves with a semi-cape on the left shoulder and a drapery cord belt.

(Source: gloriaswanson)


10:52 am, clairiere
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kateordie:

kamiexe:

chicken-fingers:

this movie was way too heavy for its intended age group

it’s actually really perfect for all ages because when kids learn this stuff early in life it stays with them 

The best all-ages material understands that kids are so much smarter than most adults give them credit for. I think stories that file down all the edges do them a disservice. There’s a lot to be said for not being afraid to be scary, to be clever, to be dangerous. That’s what we, as adults, remember. That’s why I love writing for a young audience - you’re reaching readers who are not only brilliant and intuitive, but they still believe in magic.

(Source: sometimes-alice)


10:43 am, clairiere
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